What is meant by half the power frequency

current and average performance?

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With which frequency do the instantaneous and the average power oscillate with an alternating current consumer if there is a phase shift of [tex] \ varphi = - \ frac {\ pi} {4} [/ tex] between current and voltage?
Sketch the power triangle for this consumer
How big is the power factor?

Can someone help me with this? If I interpret that correctly, is this an ohmic-capacitive consumer !? So the voltage lags behind the current ([tex] \ varphi = 45 ^ \ circ [/ tex]) !?

greeting
AW: momentary and average performance?

I would say that the current leads the voltage by 45 °.
You have that with mixed ohmic plus capacitive load.
Is of course the same as what you said, but it sounds more understandable to me.
AW: momentary and average performance?

yes, well ... it's actually a jacket like shoes ... but what frequency do the current and average power oscillate?
AW: current and average performance?

The product of two sinusoidal quantities (u and i) of a certain frequency always results in a sinusoidal quantity with twice the frequency, regardless of the phase position. The instantaneous value of the power therefore follows a sinusoidal curve with half the period.

But what do you mean by medium power? The mean? By definition, this is always a constant.
AW: current and average performance?

Well, then, P oscillates with half the period and thus with twice the frequency, regardless of the phase shift !?

I would then draw the performance triangle like this:

although you can't really say for sure whether the current or the voltage is rushing ahead, right?

then what does the power factor look like ???
AW: momentary and average performance?

Am I on the right track here? or is my performance triangle completely flat? The power factor should then be cos (45), right?
AW: current and average performance?


Actually cos (-45 °), but that is the same as cos (+ 45 °). That is why one often writes whether it is an inductive or capacitive phase shift, here "cos (phi) = 0.7 cap."