What lives in the rainforest

Animals in the rainforest

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Among those found in Central and South America Sloths The name says it all. The animals that live in the treetops of tropical rainforests spend almost their entire lives hanging upside down from branches. Your food is so poor in nutrients that any hectic movement would cost too much energy.

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Anacondas are among the largest snakes in the world. The giant snakes that live in the tropical wetlands of South America are said to be up to ten meters long. The reptiles often hunt in the water and can devour animals the size of a goat.

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The Queen Alexandra bird butterfly is the largest butterfly on earth with a wingspan of up to 28 centimeters. It occurs exclusively in the tropical rainforests of Papua New Guinea and is a popular collector's item due to its imposing size. For this reason the moth is on the "Red List of Endangered Species" as endangered classified.

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Poison dart frogs occur in the rainforests of South America in the most dazzling colors. The color signals to all predators: Be careful, I am poisonous! Some Indian tribes use the frog poison to prepare their blowpipe arrows with it. Offspring, on the other hand, are harmless, as the frogs ingest and accumulate their poison by eating poisonous prey.

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The most endangered Mountain gorillas occur only in two small regions of East Africa. The great apes living at an altitude of 2000 to 4000 meters are very shy and difficult to find. Since they are hunted illegally and their habitat is shrinking, their population is now estimated at around 1,000 animals.

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The one who lives in the northern rainforests of South America Hoatzin is one of the strangest birds on earth. It is not directly related to any other species of bird, its digestive system is reminiscent of that of a ruminant and the young birds have claws on their wings. Flying is also difficult for the hoatzin. It usually only glides from one treetop to the next - interrupted by a few flaps of its wings.

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Fruit bats are widespread in the tropical rainforests of Africa, Asia, Australia and Oceania. They are closely related to bats but do not hunt using echolocation. The crepuscular and nocturnal animals usually sleep upside down on branches during the day. Large colonies can consist of more than 500,000 fruit bats.

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The one living in South America jaguar is the third largest big cat in the world. Although it is also found in arid regions, its preferred hunting grounds are the rainforests in the Amazon. Here he can sneak up on his prey, well camouflaged. In contrast to the similar-looking leopards, jaguars cannot climb well, but they can swim persistently.

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The ones related to the alligators Caimans are the only crocodiles found in South America. In contrast to their relatives, caimans are much smaller, rarely exceeding three meters in length. They prefer calm or slow-flowing waters with a muddy bottom that they can dig into when it is dry.

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The okapi, also known as the short-necked giraffe, occurs exclusively in the rainforests in the northeast of the Democratic Republic of the Congo. Despite this small distribution area, its population is considered stable, as most of the animals live in protected areas. Nevertheless, the okapi is listed as endangered, as its small habitat is being destroyed more and more by humans.

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Once widespread in the tropical rainforests Orangutans occur today only on the islands of Borneo and Sumatra. The habitats of the second largest great apes are seriously threatened. More and more rainforests are being cut down for timber and agriculture. In addition, despite a worldwide ban, orangutans are illegally caught as babies in order to keep them as skin animals.

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Birds of paradise are the most colorful inhabitants of the rainforests of Australia and Papua New Guinea. The males need their color above all in order to find females willing to mate. The basic rule is: the more dazzling the plumage, the higher the chances that a female will jump on the courtship dance.

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Those living in Central and South America Red-eyed tree frogs sleep high in the treetops of tropical rainforests during the day. Despite their bright colors, they are huddled and barely visible to enemies with their eyes closed. At night the frogs become active to hunt insects and other invertebrates. Red-eyed tree frogs only rise from the trees during the mating season or when it rains a lot.

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The ones related to the rhinos and horses Tapirs live in the tropical rainforests of Southeast Asia, Central and South America. A characteristic feature of the tapirs is their short, powerful trunk, which they use to pluck leaves and twigs. The shy animals are loners and only come together during the mating season. Despite their considerable length of up to 2.50 meters, they are hunted by jaguars, bears, crocodiles and anacondas.

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The most striking feature of those living in Central and South America Toucans is the huge, colorful beak. In some species it makes up more than a third of the body length. Although it is so huge, the beak is very light because it is hollow inside. Despite many other assumptions, it probably only serves the birds as an air conditioner, in which excess body heat is channeled into the cavities.

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The Rhinoceros viper is one of the most venomous snakes in the world. In the central African rainforests, she hunts small mammals at night. Their tubular, hollow teeth lie against the roof of the mouth and can be folded out if necessary. Although the vipers are considered lazy to bite and sluggish, the animals resting under leaves and bushes during the day should not be frightened if possible. Without prompt treatment, a bite can be fatal.