Which are the best Indian fiction books

Reviews from the reading jury (26)

A book that captivates the reader from the first page and takes him into a distant world. London 1908. Victoria and Jeremy plan their wedding. In India there is an attack on the viceroy ... ... more

A book that captivates the reader from the first page and takes him into a distant world. London 1908. Victoria and Jeremy plan their wedding. An attack is being carried out on the viceroy in India and Jeremy is sent there to investigate. The wedding has to be postponed. At the same time, an Indian sailor is found dead in the harbor in London. He wears an amulet around his neck, inside is the picture of Victoria's father. He died a long time ago. After Victoria hasn't heard from her fiancé for a long time, she decides to go to India with her butler Hopkins under a false identity. A completely different world opens up for Victoria there. By chance, she meets the dead sailor's brother and, with her Indian maid, they go looking for Jeremy. But Victoria too has to fear for her life in India. This book is the third part about the family of Victoria, but you can read each part for yourself. The author takes us into the world of ancient India, you can smell the spices, the flowers, the food and hear the screeching of the monkeys and the screams of the birds. One experiences the pomp of the Maharajas and the misery in the slums. The book is both a detective novel and a love story. The chapters are not too long and the tension does not let go of the reader. The cover with the house and the cedar trees around it is also very well chosen. A reading that also makes you dream.

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Victoria and Jeremy want to get married. But Jeremy still receives an assignment and has to travel to India, where he is considered to be cloaked a short time later. Meanwhile a ship arrives in London and a dead one ... ... more

Victoria and Jeremy want to get married. But Jeremy still receives an assignment and has to travel to India, where he is considered to be cloaked a short time later. Meanwhile, a ship arrives in London and a dead Indian is found in the harbor. He has a medallion with him that shows Victoria's father. Victoria and her butler and confidante Hopkins get to the bottom of the matter and meet Leela, an Indian woman whom they help out of an unfortunate situation. But the matter escalates into a crime and Victoria, Hopkins and Leela travel to India under assumed names to find Jeremy.
What they experience there and the dangers they are exposed to is written down very graphically and pleasantly in this novel.

I really liked the story and that's why I like to give it 5 stars.

This review comes from our community reading jury, where reading enthusiasts can read and review books before anyone else. Here you can register for free.

Victoria Bredon, whom I already know from the previous parts "The Ruby Red Chamber" and "The Secret of the Rose Room", finally seems to have reached the goal of her wishes. She can her Jeremy, despite the ... ... more

Victoria Bredon, whom I already know from the previous parts "The Ruby Red Chamber" and "The Secret of the Rose Room", finally seems to have reached the goal of her wishes. She can marry her Jeremy, despite the resistance because he is not befitting of her class. She also successfully opposes the grandmother's goal of a wedding at Westminster Abbey. What she can't expect that Jeremy will have to postpone the wedding. He is sent to India by Sir Arthur, Scotland Yard's commissioner in a secret division. He is supposed to clear up the assassination attempt on the viceroy Lord Minto there. Since Jeremy lived in India for some time in his youth and also speaks Hindi and Urdu, he is the only one who comes into question. Unfortunately, things seem to be going wrong in India. News comes that Jeremy is missing.

Victoria Bredon, fearless as ever, decides relatively quickly not to rely on the Indian police, but takes Hopkins herself on the trip to India to find a trace of her fiancé. You can well imagine that she experiences a lot because of her wonderful unconventional manner. Hopkins, who has to accompany her for reasons of propriety, skilfully slips into the role of a Danish count, while Victoria pretends to be German. Both Jeremy skillfully manage to track down.

This is now the third adventure of the extraordinary protagonist Victoria Bredon and her butler Hopkins. Interesting that this time the action is cleverly moved to India. That gives this book a very special component. Since I was allowed to read the previous books, it was particularly interesting for me to see how the protagonists have developed. Pauline Peters has written another exciting book about the unconventional protagonist. While reading it is a lot of fun to see how the heroine tries to escape the constraints of society that are repeatedly imposed on her.

Once again I felt very well entertained, I am only too happy to recommend the book to others and have earned it five reading stars.

This review comes from our community reading jury, where reading enthusiasts can read and review books before anyone else. Here you can register for free.

Victoria and Jeremy are happy and want to finally get married soon. Much to the chagrin of Victoria's noble relatives, albeit on a smaller scale. But then the wedding has to be postponed ... ... more

Victoria and Jeremy are happy and want to finally get married soon. Much to the chagrin of Victoria's noble relatives, albeit on a smaller scale. But then the wedding has to be postponed because Jeremy gets an order from the highest authority. There was an attack in India that was foiled at the last minute. But was the attack actually aimed at the viceroy, or did the attacker who was shot have a completely different goal? Jeremy is supposed to find out more about the matter and travels, with the blessing of Victoria, to the remote, exotic land.

Meanwhile, an Indian young sailor is found murdered in London, wearing a necklace with a pendant containing a portrait of Victoria's father. Since Victoria's father, a pathologist, is unfortunately no longer among the living, Sir Arthur, from the secret police, finally turns to Victoria, who also cannot explain why the Indian had a photo of her father in his possession.

She begins to investigate the murdered man and finally comes across a young Indian woman who is in the service of an English aristocratic family. Leela, that's the name of the young lady, is very unhappy when she learns that her fiancé has been murdered, but she wants to help Victoria with her research, which soon leads the two women and Victoria's loyal butler Mr. Hopkins to India too. Victoria is now very worried about Jeremy, who has been missing for a short time ...

The third adventure takes the heroine Victoria, this time to an extremely exotic land full of beauty, which, however, harbors great dangers for her and Jeremy.
The author Pauline Peters has succeeded in creating the setting of the novel very vividly before the eyes of her readers, as the descriptions of the country and its people are very detailed. But it does not ignore the political situation either and conveys it in an interesting way. This time the criminal case takes up a larger space in the novel, which I liked very much and also on an interpersonal level; So when it comes to love, Pauline Peters wrote a few romantically written scenes for her hero couple that perfectly underpins the love the couple feels for one another; In doing so, however, it never drifts into kitsch.
I don't want to give too much away in order to possibly take the tension off the readers; But just so much- Victoria will find out some interesting things on her trip, including about her father, who once also lived in India for a while.
The novels, although a series, can also be read as “stand alone”, as Pauliene Peters offers her readers sufficient information from previous volumes. Nevertheless, I would recommend reading the books in the correct order, also because I like the Victoria Bredon series so much, because this way you can better understand the development of the characters.
I also like the visual presentation of the books very much.

In short: For fans of the historical Cozy thriller a very readable series, which I would be happy to recommend.



This review comes from our community reading jury, where reading enthusiasts can read and review books before anyone else. Here you can register for free.

The novel “Das Zedernhaus” by Pauline Peters is the third book in the “Victoria Bredon Series” and follows the works “The Ruby Red Chamber” and “The Secret of the Rose Room”.
The book contains 432 pages ... ... more

The novel “Das Zedernhaus” by Pauline Peters is the third book in the “Victoria Bredon Series” and follows the works “The Ruby Red Chamber” and “The Secret of the Rose Room”.
The book contains 432 pages and is available in paperback and e-book.

The novel is set in the early 20th century and, as with both of its predecessors, Victoria Bredon is the protagonist of the novel.
The book begins in England, where Victoria and her fiancé Jeremy are busy preparing for their wedding. But the wedding has to be postponed because Jeremy has to travel to India for the English government. When unexpected incidents occur in India, Victoria is no longer in England and she follows her fiancé to India, where she tracks down criminal activities with the help of her butler Hopkins and a new friend.

The book can be read fluently. It also stays exciting as I never had the great feeling that it was predictable.
What I personally found very enriching is that the novel provides the reader with a lot of historical background information from the English colonial times in India.
The author took up a lot of historical facts and events in the novel, which does not negatively affect the narrative style or the build-up of tension.

I can only recommend the book. It is suitable for everyone and is great to read even on vacation. The historical background information that the author offers us in no way strictly, but rather stimulates to deal with the English colonial times in India even more closely.

Simply a great novel, which is based on historical events.

This review comes from our community reading jury, where reading enthusiasts can read and review books before anyone else. Here you can register for free.

Author: in

Pauline Peters

Pauline Peters, born in 1966, is a journalist. Her passion is the British way of life. She loves country houses and parks as well as afternoon tea. In her rousing book she takes the reader into a world full of English flair, located in the misty streets of the working-class quarters as well as on the splendid country estates of the aristocracy. Young Victoria is at home in both worlds. In her attempt to uncover a family secret, she is horrified by her ...

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