Mucuna Pruriens increases testosterone

Testosterone Boost: The Best Supplements to Counteract Age and Obesity Deficits

Question:
How do you naturally increase testosterone production?


Answer :
There are several nutrients and supplements that can increase endogenous testosterone production in men and the levels of active testosterone in the blood.

For the majority of men over the age of 60 this strategy is even essential. . It can also be very useful for some athletes, men with diabetes and men with overweight in the abdominal area.

Why is testosterone so important to men?

First of all, it should be noted that a man in the first place through testosterone is a man. It influences the development of the male sex during puberty and ensures that the male appearance is maintained for a lifetime (muscle mass, hair, beard, voice tone, libido, function of the sexual organs, distribution of fats ...) and contributes to the smooth Functioning of the central nervous system (well-being, mood, development, motivation, resistance to fatigue ...). It is less well known that it affects other important areas of health such as maintaining bone structure, increasing physical performance, the correct course of spermatogenesis, protein synthesis, etc.

The problem is that as you get older, circulating testosterone levels drop. In contrast to menopausal women, hormonal changes do not occur suddenly in men at the age of fifty: the testosterone level decreases slowly but steadily (approx. 2% of active testosterone per year) from the age of 30 up to a time called "andropause" and characterized by physical and mental symptoms.

Some men reach this stage very quickly, while others don't see symptoms until they are 60 years old. Overall, it is clear that testosterone production in a 70-year-old man is 30 to 40% lower than in a young man.

What are the consequences of an age-related testosterone deficiency?

This lack of production is not without its consequences for a man's physical and mental health. We list a whole range of symptoms that are directly or indirectly related to this decline:

  • Decline in physical performance;
  • A deterioration in general well-being (1-2);
  • A loss of energy;
  • The development of benign prostatic hyperplasia (this is, in fact, the most common consequence);
  • Urinary tract disease;
  • Common Incidents of Erectile Dysfunction;
  • A decrease in libido (decreased interest in sex).
  • Insulin resistance;
  • An increased risk of multiple diseases such as sarcopenia, cataracts, depression, and cardiovascular disease (3-4);
  • Increased mortality (5).

Testosterone: why is it decreasing?

Testosterone is produced in the testes by Leydig cells from mitochondrial cholesterol. This production is regulated by two hormones made by the pituitary gland, a gland in the brain. Two enzymes can then convert testosterone: 5α reductase, which reduces it to DHT dihydrotestosterone, and aromatase, which produces estradiol (a feminizing estrogen). The rest of the testosterone is transported in the plasma.

The decrease in circulating testosterone levels may therefore be related to a decrease in endogenous production in the testes, a disruption of the pituitary gland and / or an increase in the activity of 5α reductase and aromatase.

There are 3 main risk factors that lead to a faster drop in testosterone levels:

  • Waist size. The larger a man's waist circumference, the lower testosterone levels are. Cytokines produced by adipose tissue are said to gradually break down Leydig cells (6), while adipose tissue is also the preferred place for the conversion of testosterone to estrogens (7-8) ... 40% of overweight men reportedly have abnormally low testosterone levels, regardless of age.
  • Diabetes. Many studies show that men with diabetes have lower testosterone levels. (9-11). Almost 45% of men with diabetes (12) are affected regardless of age. After being overweight, it is the strongest inducer. (13).
  • Age. In men, testosterone levels peak around the age of 30. Then aromatase activity increases, contributing to testosterone deficiency, production decreases and testosterone tends to bind to proteins more easily, reducing the amount of free testosterone available for use in tissues.

The best supplements for increasing blood testosterone levels.

Treating testosterone levels with natural products and supplements is not a nonsensical idea: The European Association of Urology (14) has officially recognized that they increase testosterone levels in the blood.

Most of these products work in two different ways:

  • By directly or indirectly increasing testosterone production;
  • By preventing the conversion of testosterone into estrogen or DHT.

Saw palmetto extract (Saw palmetto or Serenoa repens)

This extract is the most widely studied and widely used phytonutrient used to increase testosterone levels and treat benign prostatic hyperplasia, one of the most common consequences of hypogonadism. It contains several interesting active ingredients that act as inhibitors of 5α reductase (15-16) and thus increase the level of usable testosterone: campesterol, beta-sitosterol, stigmasterol, lauric acid and oleic acid.

Administered twice a day at a dose of 160 mg lipid extract, the extract from Serenoa repens led to a significant improvement in several age-related testosterone deficiency parameters (17-20) in several quality studies (21-24) over supplementation periods of at least 6 months.

The extract of the root thorn (Tribulus terrestris)

Trumpet thorn also contains compounds that can positively affect serum testosterone levels: fruostanol, dioscin, diosgenin and protodioscin. These micronutrients don't work like those of the dwarf palm: they affect the hypothalamus by increasing LH secretion, which leads to an increase in testosterone production.

For example, several studies (25) have shown that administration from the extract Tribulus terrestris (500 mg, several times a day) increases testosterone production, but also, through domino effect, promotes DHT and DHEA production. It also stimulates androgen receptors in the brain, which helps produce more LH and therefore more testosterone. However, trumpet thorn is only supposed to be suitable for people who are genuinely testosterone deficient and therefore would not allow them to exceed physiological thresholds, a goal sometimes sought by elite athletes.

Blue Passion Flower Extract (standardized in Chrysin)

The extracts of blue passion flower, propolis and royal jelly have one thing in common: they all contain chrysin, a flavonoid that strongly inhibits aromatase, the enzyme that speeds up the conversion of testosterone to estradiol (26). It also works by stimulating testosterone production. (27).

The only problem is that chrysin has low bioavailability, which limits its effectiveness in increasing testosterone levels. Passionflower extract must therefore be combined with other compounds that increase its bioavailability, such as piperine. (28-29).

Le zinc

Zinc deficiency (very common in Western countries) is clearly linked to decreased testosterone levels in the blood and low sperm concentration. And for good reason: Zinc is an aromatase inhibitor! It is also thought to play a role in testosterone production, but the mechanism is still unknown (30-31).

One study showed that 6 months of supplementation in low-zinc men (30 mg per day) doubled serum testosterone levels (32).

Vitamin D

Research has clearly shown that vitamin D deficiency limits testosterone synthesis (33-35). It is therefore not surprising that vitamin D supplementation helps increase circulating testosterone levels (36).

Hence, given the dramatic deficits around the world (especially in the central and high-altitude countries of Europe, Canada, and the United States), vitamin D supplementation is likely one of the dietary supplements of choice for boosting testosterone. And all the more so since the positive effects of such a supplement are innumerable!

Tongkat Ali extract (Eurycoma longifolia)

This extract isn't as scientifically based as the previous ones, but the latest studies show that the eurycomanone in it can increase serum testosterone levels (37-39). In one study, 8 weeks of supplementation increased testosterone levels, but also increased lean body mass by 5% (40). Two mechanisms of action are said to be responsible for these improvements: an inhibition of aromatase and a decrease in the inhibition of LH and FSH secretion in the pituitary gland.

Other dietary supplements that may affect testosterone are still being studied, such as astragalus root (Astragalus membranaceus) (41), fenugreek extract (42), extract from Mucuna pruriens (43-45), extract from Rhodiola rosea or the nettle root.


To avoid increasing the number of dietary supplements, two formulas have been developed that contain most of these ingredients:

  • Natural TestoFormula: Eurycoma longifolia, Fenugreek, Mucuna pruriens, Tribulus terrestris, Nettle root .... A complete formula designed to support and stimulate testosterone levels at all ages.
  • Natural anti-aromatase support: zinc, chrysin and various flavinic substances (quercetin, naringin, genistein ...). Rather, this formula is recommended for people who suffer from benign prostatic hyperplasia and the harmful effects of aromatase.

References

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