What is the oldest winery in France

Tue 14 May 2013, 7:03 am

Hello!

During those days I was a little interested in tradition in viticulture and then the question came up which are the oldest wine estates or families. I haven't found any really extensive answers.

In Italy Frescobaldi and Antinori?
In Austria the monasteries?
In Switzerland...?
In Germany...?
In France...?
In Spain...?

Does anyone know anything about that?

greeting

Alas

Tue May 14, 2013, 7:16 am

I suppose you mean wineries that are still in existence today (and continuously run), right?

In Austria I would actually mainly name the monasteries, especially Klosterneuburg Monastery (since 1114), Heiligenkreuz Monastery (Freihof Thallern from 1141) and Göttweig Monastery (founded in 1083).

However, the Nikolaihof in the Wachau claims to be the oldest winery in Austria, as the Romans already had viticulture at this location (mentioned in 470 AD). Does that count for your line-up, since at least during the migration period, continuous operation will hardly have been possible?

Greetings,
Gerald

Tue May 14, 2013, 7:35 am

Hello!

I expressed myself a little inaccurately.

Gerald wrote:I suppose you mean wineries that are still in existence today (and continuously run), right?



Exactly. Mostly uninterrupted. Doesn't the Nikolaihof in the Wachau perhaps have its nose further back?

greeting

Alas

Tue May 14, 2013, 7:42 am

Germany looks very similar. Introduced by the Romans and then of course the monasteries too. (e.g. Eberbach Monastery) and on the Rhine and Moselle there are a number of private wineries that can at least documentary evidence that they have been there uninterruptedly since the 15th / 16th centuries. Century but the oldest will be difficult. At least I wouldn't have anything in my head to advertise it.

Tue 14 May 2013, 8:30 a.m.

Hello Alas,

From my gut I would have said that the Bürgerspital in Würzburg is the oldest winery, founded in 1316. However, a quick search revealed that there are older ones. Prince Salm advertises to be the oldest winery in continuous family ownership and has more than 800 years of history, but an exact year is not given. At Schloss Vollrads there is a document from 1211 that documents the trade in wine. The homepage of Kloster Eberbach names 1136 as the year of foundation and the (comprehensible) history of the state court cellar in Würzburg begins with a deed of donation from 1128.
It may also not be possible to say exactly which is actually the oldest winery, because corresponding documents from the Middle Ages no longer exist.

Greetings, Christopher

Wed 15 May 2013, 3:50 p.m.

Hello!

Of course, the Romans distributed their wine culture in Europe after inheriting it from the Greeks.

toff wrote:From my gut I would have said that the Bürgerspital in Würzburg is the oldest winery, founded in 1316. However, a quick search revealed that there are older ones. Prince Salm advertises to be the oldest winery in continuous family ownership and has more than 800 years of history, but an exact year is not given. At Schloss Vollrads there is a document from 1211 that documents the trade in wine. The homepage of Kloster Eberbach names 1136 as the year of foundation and the (understandable) history of the state court cellar in Würzburg begins with a deed of donation from 1128.



That should be correct so far. Otherwise I drilled a little further and found the following results

Italy: Barons Ricasoli since 1141: http://www.ricasoli.it/The-Ricasolis-an ... -Classico /

France: Le Marquis de Goulaine - wine since around 1000: http://chateau.goulaine.online.fr/commande/vins.htm
Castle: http://www.chateaudegoulaine.fr/
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_French_wine

Spain1557: http://www.codorniu.es/home/loadhome.html

Switzerland1552: http://www.fonjallaz.info/de/fonj/l%E2% ... ne-famille

France proved surprisingly difficult. Actually, I would have suspected a winery on the Rhone.

greeting

Alas

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