What is the smartest single cell organism

The living universe

Are we alone in the Universe? This book offers a unique perspective on the question that has preoccupied mankind from the beginning. In a clear and easily understandable style, two leading astrobiology researchers examine the various pathways that lead to a diverse biosphere. Is man a galactic peculiarity or does complex life always develop on planets that are habitable long enough? Do we live in a "lonely universe" or are there a multitude of planets with complex and microbial life - a "living universe"?

Schulze-Makuch and Bains guide the reader through the story of life on earth - from the first replicating molecules to photosynthesis, the invention of sex, to intelligent living. By focusing on the functionalities of life rather than a particular biochemistry or anatomy, they explain why we should think that advanced, complex life exists on planets other than Earth.

the authors

Dirk Schulze-Makuch is Professor at the Technical University of Berlin and Associate Professor at Arizona State University and Washington State University. The geoscientist turned microbiologist and astrobiologist has been researching how life interacts with its natural environment for over 25 years.

William Bains is a researcher at MIT in Cambridge, MA, and a lecturer at the University of Warwick and other locations in the UK. Originally trained as a biochemist, he has spent most of his career in the biotechnology industry, studying how the chemistry of life works and when it fails.

Keywords

Astrobiology Origin of Life Exoplanets Evolution Fermi Paradox Life in the Universe

Authors and affiliations

  • Dirk Schulze-Makuch
  • William Bains
  1. 1. Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics (ZAA) Technical University BerlinBerlinGermany
  2. 2. Rufus Scientific Ltd., Melbourn, Royston, UK

About the authors

Dirk Schulze-Makuch is Professor at the Technical University of Berlin and Associate Professor at Arizona State University and Washington State University. The geoscientist turned microbiologist and astrobiologist has been researching how life interacts with its natural environment for over 25 years.

William Bains is a researcher at MIT in Cambridge, MA, and a lecturer at the University of Warwick and other locations in the UK. Originally trained as a biochemist, he has spent most of his career in the biotechnology industry, studying how the chemistry of life works and when it fails.

Bibliographic information